DMovies - Your platform for thought-provoking cinema

Dragonfly

Director - Andrew Tiernan - 2015

"Greasy movie"
Andrew Tiernan's indie-neo-noir-flirts-with-occultism has a delectable photography throughout and a very nice surprise in store at the end

This is not your average British indie shtick. The ruthless cop DS Blake (played by Andrew Tiernan, who also wrote and directed the film) investigates the cold case of a politician’s missing daughter, and he is soon caught up in a hurricane of dark secrets, lies, government conspiracy and backstabbing. But he’s determined to solve the mystery, even if he has to pay the highest price imaginable. Sounds vaguely familiar? Probably yes. It’s the level of careful detail within each frame and twist that makes Dragonfly special.

The tone of the narrative is somber throughout, so it’s only instinctive that Dragonfly should be filmed in black and white. It’s as if the director had decided to film in a dark environment where your cone cells responsible for colour vision are naturally switched off. The film has the thumping pace of an art film, without the unrelenting stamina of Hollywood thriller.

Dragonfly is a meditative and contemplative experience, not conducive to adrenaline rushes. Here the forensics are subordinate to the movie aesthetics. Its complexity lies is the nuanced black and white tones, and the carefully crafted photography. There are some particularly beautiful images of the London landscape and a park covered in snow.

dragonfly800450
Shona McWilliams (right) plays the film’s most surprising character.

Tiernan delivers a steady performance of a man tormented by the limitations of his job, and haunted by the prospect or not completing the task assigned to him. The cast also includes Wayne Norman as Blake’s sidekick Richard Price, Mark Wingett as the corrupt politician Francis Grosvenor (whose daughter has gone missing), Ann Mitchel as Francis’s wife and Shona McWilliams as a very ambiguous woman.

The film gradually blends in elements of film noir, detective story and occultism, but I wouldn’t want to get into too much detail without spoiling the movie twists. The story does however have some loose ends which at times are difficult to pierce together, particularly as you may get absorbed in the ingenious photography.

This is not Tiernan’s first film to deal with the subject of suspicion and mistrust in government organisations. His latest movie UK18 delves into the topic in a lot more detail, and the director has taken a lot more artistic freedoms: the movie narrative is partly devoid of chronological and logical linearity.

Dragonfly is available on VoD – just click here for more information. And don’t forget to attend the DMovies‘ screening of Andrew Tiernan’s latest movie the nightmare sci-fi UK18 on April 19th at the Regent Street Cinema – just click here in order to accede to our review of the film and here to purchase your ticket right now.



"Greasy movie"

By Victor Fraga - 11-04-2017

By Victor Fraga - 11-04-2017

Victor Fraga is a Brazilian born and London-based writer with more than 15 years of involvement in ...

DMovies Poll

Should smoking in cinema be banned?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Most Read

The world is blithely unaware of the coup [Read More...]
Back in 2010, Germany striker Mario Gomez urged [Read More...]
Pigs might fly. And so Brexit might happen. [Read More...]
Perhaps no other 20th century artist has captured [Read More...]
Forget Friday the 13th, Paranormal Activity and the [Read More...]
Thousands of reviews, opinion pieces, YouTube videos, blog [Read More...]

Read More

Extinction (Extinção)

Salomé Lamas
2018

Jeremy Clarke - 19-07-2018

A Citizen Of Nowhere? A Transnistrian national (a self-proclaimed country no other nation recognises) travels between various Eastern Bloc countries and talks about national identity with the people he meets on the journey, on hypnotic black and white film – in cinemas from Friday 20th July [Read More...]

Iceman (Der Mann aus dem Eis)

Felix Randau
2018

Eoghan Lyng - 19-07-2018

Fancy some ice-cold pasta? Film set in the snowy Alps during the neolithic period takes inspiration from European mummy found in 1991, and it has flavours of spaghetti Western - in cinemas Friday, July 27th [Read More...]

The Nun (La Religieuse)

Jacques Rivette
1966

Victor Fraga - 18-07-2018

Previously banned adaptation of Denis Diderot's tale of forced religious initiation starring Anna Karina is back in cinemas more than 50 years after its original release - out on Friday, July 27th [Read More...]

Facebook Comment

Website Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *