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Redmond Bacon

Redmond Bacon

Redmond Bacon (Writer)
British flâneur based in Berlin watching multiple films a day and with little time for his girlfriend!

Having escaped from London to Berlin, Redmond is currently attempting to live out as a flâneur who supports himself via writing. He only intended to go back for a few months, but somehow ended up living in the city for nearly two years. Now he reads horror stories about the rent prices back home and finds himself more and more attached to the German capital. Once Berlin gets too much, he’ll probably head further East, and has no idea where he will end up: just as long as it has at least one English Language cinema nearby.

Watching multiple films a day, he regularly ignores his girlfriend in the pursuit of getting his work published. His tastes are pretty diverse – from the neglected cop classic Tango and Cash (Andrei Konchalovsky,1989) the lesbian drama Show Me Love (Lukas Moodysson, 1998) to Scorsese’s best film: Wolf of Wall Street (2013). There is no particular genre he likes the most, flitting between all types of cinema in the search for something truly transcendental. A regular at film festivals, Redmond prefers watching movies over trivial things like catching up on sleep or attending to his own personal welfare. There he is in his element, constantly watching and reviewing movies as if in a perpetual trance.

He believes that films aren’t just there for entertainment purposes, but can hold a mirror up to society at large. With so much out there, the purpose of the critic is to wade through the muck and find great gems for the viewer to watch. Redmond is more than willing to provide that service for anyone who will have him, and is perpetually for hire at a very reasonable rate. He does live in Berlin after all.

You can contact him on Twitter @RedmondBacon or via his personal email at redmondbacon@gmail.com.


Other posts by Redmond Bacon
The dark humour of fatherhood
German film lays bare the awkwardness of fatherhood. We sat down with directors Henner Winckler and Ulrich Köhler to learn about their latest work! [Read More...]

24 Snow
Extremity becomes its own reward in this a loving depiction of rural life in one of the world's most inhospitable places - from the upcoming Native Spirit Festival [Read More...]

Discover Iceland in all its glory!
We sat down with Icelandic auteur Rúnar Rúnarsson to discuss Echo, covering everything from working with amateurs to the country's outstanding beauty! [Read More...]

Cinema that bites!
We sat down with the directing duo behind Space Dogs, an experimental and deeply disturbing doc depicting canine life in a never-seen-before way - live from Locarno [Read More...]

South Terminal (Terminal Sud)
Neither dramatic enough nor powerful enough to hold the viewer's interest, Swiss film wallows in vagueness when it should be ramping up the tension - live from Locarno [Read More...]

The Last Black Man In San Francisco
Both a celebration and lament for The City by the Bay, this film is also a deeply felt inquisition into the meaning of home - live from Locarno [Read More...]

Wilcox
Denis Côté's second film of 2019 is a silent tale of social insolation that sees the Quebec auteur pushing his minimalist approach to new limits! [Read More...]

Echo (Bergmál)
This surprisingly sentimental entry from Rúnar Rúnnarsson is an epic ode to his Icelandic homeland in equal parts funny and sad - live from Locarno [Read More...]

Notre Dame
See the Cathedral in its full glory for the last time in Valérie Donzelli's latest film; a breezy French comedy about womanhood and architecture - live from Locarno [Read More...]

A Voluntary Year (Das Freiwillige Jahr)
A drive to the airport turns hairy in awkward German black comedy A Voluntary Year, a brilliant tale of adolescent indecision and fatherly overbearance - live from Locarno [Read More...]

7500
7500 breathes new life into the plane hijacking thriller by confining all the action in just the cockpit itself. This is one wild ride you won't forget! [Read More...]

Space Dogs
Man's cruelty to man's best friend is merciless exposed in Russian film Space Dogs, one of the most bizarre documentaries ever made! Live from Locarno [Read More...]

Nimic
Yorgos Lanthimos shows his new short at the BFI London Film Festival! A strange provocation from the Greek auteur, it needs to be watched again and again! [Read More...]

Adolescents (Adolescentes)
Five years in the making, Adolescentes is a remarkable achievement, charting two very different girls from 13 to 18 as they grow into maturity - from the BFI London Film Festival [Read More...]

Maternal (Hogar)
What constitutes motherhood? This is the question Maternal (Hogar) wrestles with, a deeply Christian riff on the tale of the Virgin Mary! From the BFI London Film Festival [Read More...]

Last Night I Saw You Smiling (Yub menh bong keunh oun nho nhim)
A single building in Cambodia is used to interrogate a changing nation, in this quiet yet deeply affecting movie - live from Locarno [Read More...]

Notorious
The uncommonly powerful love scenes easily make this Hitchcock's most mature film. We go deep into the film noir, unlocking its striking romantic vision - back in cinemas on Friday, August 9th, more than 70 years after its original release [Read More...]

Our dirty picks from the upcoming Locarno Film Festival
We are looking out for the dirty gems from the eclectic programme at Locarno so you don't have to. They include the latest films by Tarantino, Kapadia, Kurosawa and many more! [Read More...]

Do The Right Thing
Three decades after its original release, Spike Lee's magnum opus has lost none of its power to provoke and delight in equal measure - back in cinemas on Friday, August 2nd [Read More...]

The Wedding Guest
Michael Winterbottom's latest action thriller is a travelogue of the world's second most populous nation, and it starts off very well before it descends into something predictable and trite - now also available on VoD [Read More...]

Don’t Look Now
Nicolas Roeg's horror masterpiece is back in cinemas nearly 50 years after its original release, and it remains a harrowing reminder of our impermanence, and the immutability of our future - out on Friday, July 5th [Read More...]

Vita and Virginia
Virginia Woolf has never been this dull and joyless before, in awful British biopic featuring a miscast Gemma Arterton and Elizabeth Debicki - in cinemas Friday, July 5th [Read More...]

Amin
The harshness and poetry of immigrant life is empathetically rendered in this quiet slice-of-life drama about the power of human connection under difficult constraints - in cinemas Friday, June 21st [Read More...]

Halston
The eternal conflict between art and commerce is stylishly presented in this documentary, charting the rise and fall of one of the US's top fashion designers - in cinemas Friday, June 7th [Read More...]

Kind Hearts and Coronets
British comedy still retains the ability to pierce right through the rotten heart of the country's class system - 70th anniversary edition of Ealing Studios' classic is in cinemas Friday, June 7th [Read More...]

Last Summer
Four boys in the Welsh countryside of the 1970s grapple with an unexpected tragedy, and face the premature tensions of adulthood, in a film with strong echoes of Boyz n The Hood - in cinemas Friday, June 7th [Read More...]

A Vigilante
A victim of domestic abuse turns into for-hire vigilante, in this satisfying American revenge tale - in cinemas and also on digital HD on Friday, May 31st. [Read More...]

Monty Python’s Life of Brian
Redmond Bacon argues that the British comedy is a prescient denunciation of populism and the "blithering idiots" leading the world - 40th anniversary reedition of the classic is in cinemas Thursday, April 18th [Read More...]

Yuli – The Carlos Acosta Story
Tender portrait of iconic ballet dancer doubles up as an exploration of fatherhood and also of the artist's home nation Cuba - now available on VoD [Read More...]

Last Breath
Documentary follows the tragic predicament underwater oil worker with just minutes of oxygen left to survive after his equipment breaks down - in cinemas Friday, Apriil 5th [Read More...]

A Clockwork Orange
As Stanley Kubrick's ultraviolent and dystopian crime thriller hits UK cinemas almost five decades after its original release, Redmond Bacon investigates what's beneath the surface - out on Friday, April 5th [Read More...]

Maiden
Sailing against the current! Doc about first all-women crew of an around-the-world yacht race is an ode to female perseverance in a macho world - in cinemas Friday, March 8th [Read More...]

Once Upon a Time in London
British gangster movie has historical depth, but it's ultimately watered down by down by a run-of-the-mill script and countless cliches - in cinemas Friday, April 19th [Read More...]

Piercing
Director of The Eyes of My Mother returns with a tribute to giallo bursting with extravagant aesthetics and vivid tunes, while also lacking some substance - in cinemas Friday, February 15th [Read More...]

América
Simple and uplifting documentary takes an an affecting look at the complexities of end-of-life care in Mexico - in cinemas Friday, February 8th [Read More...]

The Raft
Is this Big Brother's grandfather? The surviving members of a very strange social experiment are brought together nearly a century later: the 11 strangers were made to live on a raft for three months cut off from the rest of the world - now available on VoD [Read More...]

The House By The Sea (La Villa)
A father’s legacy is minutely dissected in this stirring tale of regret, nostalgia and the true meaning of community spirit - in cinemas Friday, January 11th [Read More...]

Santa Claus (Le Père Noël)
A petty criminal disguised as Santa Claus learns the true meaning of Christmas, in festive French comedy that never overstays its welcome - out on VoD on Monday, December 17th (with Walk This Way) [Read More...]

Free Solo
Ain't no mountain high enough? Extreme climber wants to become the first person to achieve an impressive feat, with very little concern for the possible consequences of his actions - now available on VoD [Read More...]

Flemish Heaven (Le Ciel Flamand)
Set in a brothel on the French-Belgian border, queasy tale asks difficult questions about parenthood and responsibility - available throughout December on ArteKino [Read More...]

Back to Berlin
Detailing the journey of 11 bikers taking the torch to the 2015 European Maccabi games in Berlin, sombre documentary lays bare the worst atrocity to ever occur in human history - now available on VoD [Read More...]

Becoming Animal
This is NOT your average Planet Earth episode... based on David Abram's reflections on how humans have evolved differently from other animals, doc raises questions about the relation between technology and nature - in cinemas from Thursday, November 22nd [Read More...]

The Workshop (L’atelier)
Angry without a cause? Teacher has to grapple with student's "white anxiety" and latent nationalism, as she attempts to help younger people to integrate into the world of work - French drama in cinemas Friday, November 16th [Read More...]

Free Lunch Society (Komm Komm Grundeinkommen)
What if everyone was entitled to "free" money, regardless of work? Doc investigates the concept of Universal Basic Income, and the successful pilots across the globe - from Walk This Way VoD [Read More...]

Step Up The Plate (Entre Les Bras)
The legacy of a family restaurant is explored in this French documentary, that is as much about fatherhood as it is about cooking - now available with Walk This Way VoD [Read More...]

King of Crime
An entertaining British crime caper with more twists and turns than most television series, plus offering a refreshing way forward for old-school British gangsters movies, is out in cinemas Friday, November 2nd [Read More...]

Our dirty questions to Alberto Sciamma
We spoke to the Spanish director of I Love My Mum, a British comedy laced with sociopolitical undertones, Brexit tropes and jokes about nationalism, plus it's also a picturesque tour of Europe and North Africa - the film premieres at the Cambridge Film Festival [Read More...]

I Love My Mum
British comedy about haggling mother and son accidentally shipped to Morocco humanises refugees and also functions as a trope for Brexit; it's a real delight to watch - in cinemas Friday, May 31st [Read More...]

How Ally’s father is crucial to the success of his daughter
Our writer takes a dirty look at the third remake of the Hollywood classic A Star is Born, and reveals why the paternal figure, played by Andrew Dice Clay, remains instrumental to the protagonist, played by a dazzling Lady Gaga  [Read More...]

Life Feels Good (Chce Sie Zyc)
Polish film depicts disability in a candid and positive light, without shying away from more difficult topics such as sexuality - watch it now with Walk This Way [Read More...]

Kusama – Infinity
Japanese artist who arrived in New York in the 1950s challenged the male orthodoxy of the art world; her highly stylised, Pop-Art like patterns are perfect for the Instagram age - in cinemas Friday, October 5th [Read More...]

Burkinabé Rising 
People have the power! Doc reveals that a grassroots revolution transformed Burkina Faso in a real democracy, and how the surrounding art world helped to articulate the resistance - from the Native Spirit Film Festival taking place between October 10th and 21st [Read More...]

Matangi Maya M.I.A.
The London-born incendiary singer of Sri Lankan origin has always been caught between two worlds, and she is now the subject of what's possibly the best documentary of the year - out on VoD on Monday, December 10th. [Read More...]

One Wild Moment (Un Moment d’Égarement)
One move is all it takes! Vincent Cassel plays a fundamentally decent man whose life is turned upside down due to one single extraordinarily bad mistake, in French genre-bender - watch it now at home with Walk this Way [Read More...]

Under The Wire
Marie Colvin dedicated her life to extreme journalism for selfless reasons instead of career ambitions; now the "Wonder Woman" becomes the subject of a documentary that raises key questions about the role of the media in conflict zones - in cinemas Friday, September 7th. [Read More...]

What Keeps You Alive
Canadian filmmaker (who also happens to be one half of The Vicious Brothers) twists traditional woods horror story to convincing results - in cinemas and also on VoD on Friday, August 24th (US viewers) and as part of FrightFest on August 25th (UK viewers) [Read More...]

Bad Samaritan
American horror-thriller starring David Tennant about a well-intentioned criminal faced with a very unusual situation moves in more ways than one, a little bit like in a chess game - in cinemas Friday, August 24th [Read More...]

Rondo
Not a surefire recipe for a dirty movie! Extreme tale of sex and violence has very little to say and even less to show, and it's contrary to the teachings of Godard - from the Fantasia Film Festival [Read More...]

I Can Quit Whenever I Want (Smetto Quando Voglio)
Cash-strapped academics take arms in order to make ends meet, in Italian blend of gangster and comedy with flavours of Guy Ritchie and plenty of social commentary - available for digital streaming on July 9th as part of the Walk This Way collection [Read More...]

Look the other way!
Egyptian filmmaker Abu Bakr Shawky challenges the conformism of cinema by casting a different gaze at actors with leprosy and various disabilities in his film YOMEDDINE; he talks to us about selecting the actors, filming and why cinema should be bold! [Read More...]

The Bachelors
When life (and a film) becomes insufferable! Drama dealing with mental health issues and starring Julie Delpy is well-intentioned but also so riddled with clichés it's hardly bearable to watch - in cinemas March 30th [Read More...]

Gook
Two Korean-American shop runners befriend a Black girl during the 1992 Los Angeles riots, in a film with strong echoes of Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing - on DVD and all major VoD platforms on April 9th [Read More...]

Yugo-nostalgia checks into the present!
Swiss-born director Nicolas Wagnières talks about his film Hotel Jugoslavija and the Balkans, a region grappling with nostalgia of a defunct country as well as the rise of nationalism [Read More...]

A Symphony of Summits: The Alps from Above (Die Alpen: Unsere Berge von Oben )
Climb ev'ry mountain! Take a vertiginous look at a range system that spreads across multiple nations and epitomises Europe like no other - out on VoD as part of the Walk This Way Collection on March 5th [Read More...]

The Russian filmmaker who shot Elvis!
Read our exclusive interview with Aleksei German Jr., the director of Sergei Dovlatov's biopic, whom he describes as "the Elvis Presley of Russian literature" [Read More...]

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One thought on “Redmond Bacon

  1. I suppose it’s neither here nor there, and I’m just nitpicking, but Alex isn’t ‘raping’ the woman in the ending’s fantasy sequence. She’s gleefully riding Alex on top, and seems to be enjoying herself quite a bit.

    I guess one could make the argument that Alex is raping her because she seems to try to pull her arms away from his grasp – all while she’s laughing and enjoying herself, by the way. I think the sequence is basically just Alex screwing again, and doing so w/ the approval of the society that once condemned him. It’s meant to show that he’s “cured alright”, and is back to having sex – and raping – on his mind without getting violently ill, and is on top of the world. But he ain’t flat-out raping the woman. Would’ve been more accurate to write that in the fantasy sequence Alex was simply having sex again.
    I’ve noticed over the years that British film critics. especially, often make minor – and sometimes major – factual and interpretive mistakes in their reviews, so I’m not at all surprised this reviewer got it sort of wrong. Why do they often make mistakes? It’s a fascinating, alarming, and occasionally hilarious phenomenon.

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