DMovies - Your platform for thought-provoking cinema

Gaza Mon Amour

Director - Arab and Tarzan Nasser - 2020

"Dirty gem"
Charming and sensitive Palestinian movie finds romance at old age in a very conservative and impoverished society - live from Venice

QUICK SNAP: LIVE FROM VENICE

Issa (Salim Dau) is a 60-year-old fisherman confined to the three-mile strip of the Mediterranean Sea which Palestinians are allowed to use. He leads a very lonely existence, without a wife, children or even a dog. His best friend wants to move to Europe, leaving their “shitty” land behind. His sister visits him occasionally, and seems to be the only one who cares for the lonely man. He longs for his youth, when he was in love with an 18-year-old adolescent “more beautiful than the moon” and there was no such fishing strip (the seas were open for navigation, at a time when Gaza was not surrounded by truculent Israeli forces).

One day, while trawling the sea Issa fishes an ancient Greek statue of Apollo, with a full-on erection. He hides the relic in his closet, accidentally snapping its penis off in the process. Eventually, the Palestinian police uncover his unusual find, and Issa is consequently arrested for a short period of time. The castrated statue and Issa have some similarities: they are sexually inactive and mostly lifeless males. It is not in vain that Issa retains the snapped genitalia long after the police have seized the statue.

But Issa is determined not to end up like the Greek relic, forgotten at the bottom of the sea. So he sets out to find love. He is enamoured with the seamstress Siham (played by the famous Palestinian actress and filmmaker Hiam Abbass). He wishes to ask for her hand, but encounters a number of obstacles in a deeply conservative society where arranged marriages are still common and family “honour” is paramount. His sister disapproves of the relationship simply because Siham’s daughter has a “disreputable” life. But Issa is stubborn, and he wishes to press ahead anyway.

Directed by two Palestinian twins, who dedicated the film to their father, Gaza Mon Amour is a delicate labour of love. Both Dau and Abbass deliver gently moving performances. The camera is mostly observational, almost Brechtian, with sparse lighting and numerous takes filmed from behind objects. The vaguely sombre and claustrophobic mood is offset by Issa’s quiet joi-de-vivre and intense determination to find company. This is a movie about small gestures of rebellion (against family, against authorities, against Israeli forces) carried out in the name of love. The ending is particularly effective, brimming with hope and humanity.

Gaza Mon Amour is showing at the 77th Venice International Film Festival, which is taking place right now.



"Dirty gem"

By Victor Fraga - 05-09-2020

By Victor Fraga - 05-09-2020

Victor Fraga is a Brazilian born and London-based writer with more than 15 years of invol...

DMovies Poll

Are the Oscars dirty enough for DMovies?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Most Read

Forget Friday the 13th, Paranormal Activity and the [Read More...]
Just a few years back, finding a film [Read More...]
A lot of British people would rather forget [Read More...]
A small family of four lives in a [Read More...]
Pigs might fly. And so Brexit might happen. [Read More...]
Holidaying in Cambodia with Isaac (Ross McCall), Ben [Read More...]

Read More

Forget Fast & Furious: four dirty movies featuring car action

 

Rod Wells - 26-07-2021

Our reader Rod Wells picks favourite car action movies, while arguing that the film subgenre is an integral part of a much broader subculture [Read More...]

The Most Beautiful Boy in the World

Kristina Lindström, Kristian Petri
2021

Michael McClure - 26-07-2021

The life of the young star of the Luchino Visconti's Death in Venice was not as enviable and beautiful as his character, reveals this heartbreaking documentary - in cinemas Friday, July 30th [Read More...]

Bye Bye Morons (Adieu les Cons)

Albert Dupontel
2021

Ian Schultz - 21-07-2021

Delightful and quirky French movie about mother on a quest to find her son topped the Césars earlier this year and has abundant references to Terry Gilliam - in cinemas on Friday, July 23rd; also available on Curzon Home Cinema [Read More...]

Facebook Comment

Website Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *